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6PM vs Jay Park vs JYPE September 25, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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The brouhaha still continues as of today. I can’t stop staring curiously at every entry about Jay Park that has been crossing in and out a lot of internet portals lately. I haven’t really write anything other than commenting one of the article from MTV Asia and wrote some of reasons why Jay needs to be in 2PM on one of the hottest 2PM forum.. Indifference about it? Nope. I believe every other internet portal already post everything up and I don’t really want to invade my blog with all the news for one reason: the missing fundamental factor of the missing leader.

I read a lot of netizen comments about how JYP is using this as a “mask”, to conceal everything until the very last minute where 2PM has to get up and promote their new album. Probably Jay Park returns will be an epic story in the entire KPop histories. It’s only a thought. Another story is about Jay Park didn’t really want to return because his self esteem has been broken by the harsh netizen comments. No matter how many letters, comments, and post it notes Hottest wrote, it seems that the missing leader is buried under the earth. Nothing could conceal what’s the actual truth out there. The other story is about how all Hottest with all their might trying to capture JYPE and the whole world’s attention with the boycott, returned CDs, protest, and even flash mob from everywhere. To help the Hottest out, The KPop industries start to make a comment on this commotion. While all of those has been buried by JYPE notice on the website, Wooyoung’s comment on his minihompy, all the riddles and clues on 2PM members’ minihompy, all Wondergirls member stays quiet in the comment / question, it doesn’t seems to hold back the Hottest.

While this whirlwind still ongoing in its pace, I read a lot of other news about how JYP’s tire got slashed, JYP is going to Seattle to meet Jay Park, the rest of 2PM members is actually do not agree with JYPE’s decision to kick Jay Park out of 2PM, insight from Jay Park’s close friends and family friends. I really believe there’s something. Something really ridiculous that these things should came across the news. Even though the person who starts this fuss surrender and post an apology entry, things wouldn’t get any better. Damaged has been done.

My personal opinion on this can be articulated with one sentence: This is the epitome of ignorance.  I do agree with this comment: “Instead of trying to seek truth, sometimes it is more important to know what others are thinking. The public leaned toward the massive reports and opinions and that is why the public sentiment turned ugly against him so quickly without seeing the whole picture,” *

With all of those in mind, I still can’t grasp the meaning behind all of these. Is it only a scheme? Is it a conspiracy? Against what? What’s the goal? Nobody can even answer this question. Only JYPE can answer this. I really hope Jay Park will rise from the hardship. I really want to see 2PM again and again as one whole group.

The news from Korea Times that you could read:
*Korea Times: Will Fallen Idol Star Make Comeback
Korea Times: 
‘2PM’ Case Shows Lack of Understanding on O’seas Koreans
Korea Times: 2PM Mess

Support 2ONEDAY’s JB project ~ 999 Reasons September 12, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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Fiuhh.. thinking hard and I came up with 3. Why did I do this? I don’t know. I just do what I think it’s right not because the whole world is doing it ^^

Hopefully you guys can support 2oneday’s project ! I really think it’s a good experience because by writing it, I remember why I like 2PM at the first place.

Here’s my thought:

Picture 4

Picture 3

Picture 2

Some people say that I’m a hard core Korean followers. I might not agree with that comment but I want to say that even tho I’m not Korean, I’m proud of Korean Culture and It’s people. JB’s case makes everyone joining forces together to support what’s right and accept the facts. That’s the most important thing and I despise all the netizens who lights up the fire and creates this havoc.

Thus, SUPPORT 2OD ! ^^

너무 맘이 아픕니다 September 8, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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Yes, My heart is hurting. So much things happened in 4 days span. I’m still hoping that the whole commotion of Dong Bang Shin Ki will stop anytime and they can come back to perform. While waiting on the news, I’m so heartbroken to find out that 2 PM has lost its leader, Park Jaebeom. I understand his decision to come back to America. Probably he will have quieter life here in US while all of these news winding down. I’m just so surprised and upset.

2 PM has grown in me lately. I no longer think that they’re only “a clown”  who jokes around and not really doing a good job. But those mindset has been changed due to a lot of 2PM’s reality shows. I really think they deserved the whole commotion of being the hottest idol group in Korea. Park Jaebeom himself shows a strong support for 2PM. He’s a cool leader and has different vibe than any other Idol Group leaders.

For now my currently favorite show, Wild Bunny, will have to stop. I hope Korean Netizens will learn from this and learn about things first before putting up those whole non-sense stupidity. My best wishes to the rest of 2PM members, Fighting !!

Heartbroken..

For those of you trying to follow all the news about Park Jaebeom, you can follow 2OD (twooneday) in their twitters.

TVXQ and the rest August 18, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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When I read this @ KPop JJang, my heart flutter as all of the comments really summarize why I love TVXQ from the beginning. This article is worthy to be posted everywhere ^^

The voice of Xiah Junsu is Asia’s treasure
-Matsuo Kiyoshi-

What people say about DBSK is that…
they are one of the few juniors who are polite and has good thoughts
-Comedian Jung Sun Hee-

DBSK is the singer with the best manners
-Show Music Tank PD-

(During an interview about Big Bang)
Oh! There is one singer that I admired as I watched them sing.
DBSK is really amazing,
They were singing a live performance and by watching them without a bias, they sing very well,
If they were ugly, they would be called men version of Big Mama.
Korean people have a preconception about DBSK and that is wrong.
-YG Entertainment Yang Hyun Suk-

We are a different genre so I don’t think we are rivals.
DBSK is a senior that we acknowledge.
Everyone sings well and I think they put in a lot of thoughts into their choreography and performances.
They continue to show self-improvement and are setting a good example as sunbae.
-Singer G-Dragon-

I saw Xiah Junsu sing ‘Resignation’ and it was the best.
A lot of singers sang my song but out of them all, it stood out the most and was sung very well.
-Big Mama-

-I sang a Goose’s Dream with Yongwong Jaejoong and he sang it the best.
He is an idol singer, so I thought he could not sing well because he is just good looking and dances well but he sings better than me.
-Insooni-

I think I would have really liked it if i was a DBSK member.
They are an unbelievably amazing group.
-Kim Gun Mo-

-When they are singing their songs, and in their divided parts, they know exactly how to sing their part in order to complete the song. They are perfectly divided well.
-Music Critic Jung Byung Gi-

Unless you are a fan who buys an album and listens to the whole thing, you do not realize how Yongwoong Jaejoong can sing octaves without effort, how much density Xiah Junsu has in his voice, and how great of a song ‘One’ is.
-Triple Crown Kang Myung Suk-

Their appearances are needed to capture attention.
That is the only way the dying music industry might be vitalized.
In that sense, there must be a lot of teams like DBSK in the industry. I’m not talking about just idol singers.
Groups like DBSK who can powerfully capture the mass audience’s attention is needed to revitalize the music industry.
-Tony An-

-Looking at junior singers these days, there are a lot of good looking juniors.
Out of all of them, I think DBSK is the best.
They seem to be fully prepared on stage.
-Singer Kim Dong Wan (Shinhwa)-

When looking at DBSK, I get the feeling that they are skilled.
Compared to before, they are so much better skill-wise.
Despite their skills, people have preconceptions, which is a problem and on stage their charisma is excellent.
They have other charms as well so there is a lot to be enviable about.
-Singer Evan-

DBSK is too good to remain as idol singers.
They can go further, as musicians to do well.
SM doesn’t just have idol singers.
Of the existing idols, they are the most skilled group.
As for Xiah Junsu and Youngwoong Jaejoong,
they can be called the best singers in the music industry without comparison.
DBSK is really a great group.
-Composer KENZI-

Choikang Changmin’s voice is very average.
But at times, the average excels many singers’ voices.
-Papa Nia-

(On Junsu) He takes care of everything about me before going on stage.
I think he is great and has a pure soul.
-Singer Jang Ri In-

-We feel envious and proud that DBSK succeeded in Japan.
-Singer Super Junior-

DBSK were candidates with us.
At first, we thought “what do we do~” “we are nothing~” when we were against DBSK
But when we saw DBSK cheering for us too, we felt the love at once between us singers.
Really, we felt very very thankful.
-Singer Tablo (Epik High)-

-It can’t be said that DBSK is the best vocalist in Korea.
However, it is undeniable that it is hard to see a group able to make a beautiful harmony with just five members’ voice.
This shows the possibility of a vocal group, not just celebrity like idol group.
This is the idol group after evolution in the 21st century.
-m.net 21c Artist-

I was impressed with DBSK when I saw them performing at the Great Hall of the People in China on July 2004.
It was a shock to see Chinese fans sending such passionate cheers. I feel pride that I am promoting Korean mass culture in foreign countries. I want to invite DBSK as models for fashion shows abroad. They have clear souls and pure qualities.
-Desinger Andre Kim-

Out of the singers that have sang my song, they have succeeded the most.
And they are also the first singers who fit my song so well.
-Composer Park Chang Hyun (DBSK 1st Single ‘Hug’ Composer)-

I like DBSK.
It is bit of an inconvenience that their chances to sing live are limited because of their strong choreography, but when I see their performance, I am drawn in.
-Singer Baek Ji Young-

-They are good young men.
In such positions, they greet well and are social.
They are always smiling and never shows fatigue.
Honestly, they are not very fluent in Japanese.
Even if they understand well, their speaking is not perfect.
Despite that, they really tried hard to do their interview in Japanese.
For words they didn’t know, the asked their managers before hand and took note of it.
They tried their best to speak well and I could feel their efforts.
They really try their best.
-DJ 古家正亨- (this is the Japanese character of his name. His last name is Masayuki (?) but I can’t really type his first name. >< Maybe someone who knows Japanese better can do his name?)

Even in the hard market right now, their influence in the music industry should be recognized.
The music industry is going through hardships and in this situation, there was almost no singers who sold a lot of albums.
But DBSK is unchallenged and has the powers to sell their albums.
They do have a lot of teenage fans but recently, I think their fanbase has broadened to 20-30s.
As the teenage fans get older, the average age of their fan base will broaden.
Idol groups definitely go through evolution.
They have both singing and dancing skills so they need to be recognized.
-Singer Na Sung Ho (Noel)-

It is a good feeling that the younger generation singers are singing my songs.
If DBSK remakes my song, it will have a different color.
Even though the color will be different, I think they will be able to make a better song.
-Singer Jo Kwan Woo-

DBSK is just before perfection.
They are the hottest trend going through various rumors and is a popular culture icon. When they become this era’s new classic, we want to meet them again, more fashionable and fabulous. It won’t be too late to complete the ‘work’ then.
-In December issue of VOGUE-

I listen to music.
I like rock ballad and hip hop.
As for singers, DBSK is the best.
-Volleyball athlete Kim Yeon Kyung-

-The reason why there is so much interest in DBSK is because unlike most of the kid groups, their singing abilities are excellent. All five members sing and unexpectedly, presents a good harmony. It breaks the bias that boy bands cannot sing. This is what separates other idol groups and DBSK.
-Music critic Im Jin Mo-

Just at first glance, I could feel the strong charisma that made me realize why they become the millennium star.
The composition of the five members, like the process of moving one picture, cannot be complete without the 5 members.
I was surprised that the 5 stars, placed as one pleases, created such harmony.
Truthfully, taking a group photograph is exponentially hard as the number of people.
So during group photography, positions change and styles are frequently switched.
But in DBSK’s case, an impressive style was expressed just by them randomly standing and sitting there.
-Photographer Jo Se Hyun-

You should judge them by how much they love music and stop focusing on “lip synching idol stars winning awards.”
And this year was the year that DBSK had to win.
Why keep denying it and how many albums did they sell… 300,000?
Even when the music industry is reduced, they sold 300,000. That is praiseworthy.
Do you know anybody who we call artists that sell over 50,000?
And does the broadcasting stations buy those albums for the artists?
Did the broadcasting station buy 300,000 copies of DBSK’s album?
Then, did you buy the albums of artists that you cheer for?
Starting from there, saying “how does idol stars who lip sync win an award” is useless.
Do you think that these days, just like those old days, the idols run away by lip sync because they can’t sing?
Just open the microphone and tell them to sing. They do well, very~
-Shin Hae Chul-

Before you curse on the young singers who dance and roll around, think about how many hours they invest into practicing to perform to the mass.
Just like how natural-born talented artists dig only one hole, they sweat in order to improve themselves.
Therefore, the older generation singers are wretched for criticizing these singers for their music perfection.
If they receive reverence as a musician for these criticisms, the value of it is nothing.
-From Bestiz, who.au-

-The rumors that the five members were supposed to lead five different teams due to their excellent skills, but due to financial pressure, was put in one team, doesn’t seem totally false.
The harmony that the five sing are solid and constant.
-IZM-

Thank you DBSK fans.
DBSK and Kang Ho Dong is close, it’s the truth really.
-Kang Ho Dong-

I feel envious of DBSK for their teenage fans.
When DBSK performance ends, the teenage fans follow their van or wait in front of their company.
But when I am done with a performance, my fans say, “Ji Hoon, great job.”
Park Jin Young hyung once asked me why I don’t have teenage fans.
-Singer Rain-

These kids were wasted. They are all worthy to be solo artists, but formed a group.
-SM Director Lee Soo Man-

Even though it must be hard because so many people recognize them, they always come to greet when we are on the same program. It must be hard to just move around. When they reach the top, at least one hardship comes, but I hope they will get over it well.
-Singer The One-

Source: Soompi
Source: KPop JJang (Minsarang @ wordpress)

Pop Goes Korea August 10, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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Interesting article that I read at Minsarang. I think the writer of this article summed it really well.

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There is a fairly decent overview of the contract situation faced by entertainers in Korea over in today’s Joongang Ilbo. Using the lawsuit Dong Bang Shin Gi (aka TVXQ) has filed against SM Entertainment as the peg, the article looks at the long and onerous contracts that most entertainers in Korea have to have, especially singers.
As you have probably heard, on July 31, three members of DBSG filed suit against its management company, claiming their contract is unfair. DBSG is one of SME’s most popular bands these days, and is doing especially well in Japan, where they recently played two nights in the Tokyo Dome. The band’s complaints were mostly the same things we have heard over and over again in Korea over the years — their contracts are too long, their contracts do not pay enough, the penalties for leaving the management company are too severe, the performers do not have enough control over their own careers, the performers are not paid enough (probably the biggest issue).
I do not want to get into the details of DBSG’s particular case. That is something for the Korean courts to decide. But I do think that cases like these bring up a much bigger point.
Arguing about the “fairness” of idol contracts — how many years should they be, how much should the performers be paid, etc. — misses the big point. I am tempted to call it “Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic,” but that is probably a bit harsh — after all, the Korean entertainment industry is showing few signs of sinking any time soon. It is more like arguing about what kind of pain reliever is best for a critically ill patient. That is, such talk deals mostly with the symptoms of the disease and misses out entirely on the causes.
Korea’s pop idols are not paid poorly and overcontrolled because the management companies are evil. The management companies are just doing their best within the current system. And judging by the long list of big stars who have emerged from Korea’s music system over the years, they are apparently doing something right.
The trouble is, Korea’s music system itself, which is very resource-intensive and very top-down (like far too much of the Korean economy in general). Because the burden of developing stars and marketing them falls solely on the music companies, it takes a huge amount of money to create new stars. The biggest companies have over 50 performers (mostly young people) in training at a time, taking dance classes, singing classes, learning how to act like stars, and usually living in company housing, eating food paid for by the company, being driven everywhere by the company. All this adds up pretty quickly.
So when a band gets paid pennies for an album sale, you have to remember that the performers spent years in training before they earned any money, and that for each performing earning money and doing well, there are many other aspiring young people who never make it, but who nonetheless burn through company money. How many hopefuls does each company have for each performer who makes it? Five? Ten? I do not know, but it is big enough.
The real problem (as I argue in my book, POP GOES KOREA) is the lack of diversity in Korea’s music business, in particular the lack of a live music scene. In most countries, live music is the core, the heart. Young people pick up instruments and play in their parents’ garages or wherever. Some get good enough to play in clubs. A few get good enough to put out albums (or MP3s or whatever). A very few make money. Basically, the cost and inconvenience of developing acts falls on the wanna-be performers. By the time they get to the music labels, a lot of the winnowing and development has already happened.
Even in Japan, where J-Pop is big business, you have J-Rock and jazz and a fairly wide range of choices. And choices drive competition, when reduces the stranglehold that music companies otherwise might have.
Strangely, Korea used to have a great live music scene. It was a long time ago, but back in the 1960s and 1970s, most of the big performers had a live music background, whether playing on the US Army bases around the country or playing the live clubs of Myeong-dong or wherever. Even in the 1980s, as Korea’s music scene turned more poppy and synthesized (and saccharine), there was still a live foundation most of the acts had — Cho Yong-pil, Shin Hae-chul, Jo Sung-mo, and the like were all live performers first.
But in the early 1990s, the scene began to change, especially with the coming of Seo Taiji. Even though Seo Taiji wrote his songs (well, mostly) and performed them himself, he typically performed them prerecorded, with The Boyz dancing away furiously beside him. It was the formula that Korea’s music companies would use to create their boy- and girl-bands. And soon the manufactured dance bands came fast and furious. Within a few years, they dominated the TV music shows, Mnet, and the like.
For a generation of young people in Korea, being a “star” has meant being a dancer first, a pretty face and perhaps a singer. Very few young people pick up a guitar with dreams of making it big. Sure, plenty of kids play music, for any number of reasons. But few harbor serious dreams of using the guitar (or whatever) to become rock stars.
And as long as the live music scene is not a viable route to becoming a star in Korea, the local music scene will remain dominated by the music labels and manufactured pop music.
The funny thing is, for all the talk of the dominating power of the music companies, the truth is they are actually very weak. They are merely responding to the economics they are given. If young people were to choose different music, the whole system would fall apart. If playing in Hongdae became a route to fame and fortune, then the system would have to change. But as long as Korean young people show no interest in anything but K-Pop, all they will be given is K-Pop. And the system will not really change.
Source: Mark Russell@Kpop Wars

There is a fairly decent overview of the contract situation faced by entertainers in Korea over in today’s Joongang Ilbo. Using the lawsuit Dong Bang Shin Gi (aka TVXQ) has filed against SM Entertainment as the peg, the article looks at the long and onerous contracts that most entertainers in Korea have to have, especially singers.

As you have probably heard, on July 31, three members of DBSG filed suit against its management company, claiming their contract is unfair. DBSG is one of SME’s most popular bands these days, and is doing especially well in Japan, where they recently played two nights in the Tokyo Dome. The band’s complaints were mostly the same things we have heard over and over again in Korea over the years — their contracts are too long, their contracts do not pay enough, the penalties for leaving the management company are too severe, the performers do not have enough control over their own careers, the performers are not paid enough (probably the biggest issue).

I do not want to get into the details of DBSG’s particular case. That is something for the Korean courts to decide. But I do think that cases like these bring up a much bigger point.

Arguing about the “fairness” of idol contracts — how many years should they be, how much should the performers be paid, etc. — misses the big point. I am tempted to call it “Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic,” but that is probably a bit harsh — after all, the Korean entertainment industry is showing few signs of sinking any time soon. It is more like arguing about what kind of pain reliever is best for a critically ill patient. That is, such talk deals mostly with the symptoms of the disease and misses out entirely on the causes.

Korea’s pop idols are not paid poorly and overcontrolled because the management companies are evil. The management companies are just doing their best within the current system. And judging by the long list of big stars who have emerged from Korea’s music system over the years, they are apparently doing something right.

The trouble is, Korea’s music system itself, which is very resource-intensive and very top-down (like far too much of the Korean economy in general). Because the burden of developing stars and marketing them falls solely on the music companies, it takes a huge amount of money to create new stars. The biggest companies have over 50 performers (mostly young people) in training at a time, taking dance classes, singing classes, learning how to act like stars, and usually living in company housing, eating food paid for by the company, being driven everywhere by the company. All this adds up pretty quickly.

So when a band gets paid pennies for an album sale, you have to remember that the performers spent years in training before they earned any money, and that for each performing earning money and doing well, there are many other aspiring young people who never make it, but who nonetheless burn through company money. How many hopefuls does each company have for each performer who makes it? Five? Ten? I do not know, but it is big enough.

The real problem (as I argue in my book, POP GOES KOREA) is the lack of diversity in Korea’s music business, in particular the lack of a live music scene. In most countries, live music is the core, the heart. Young people pick up instruments and play in their parents’ garages or wherever. Some get good enough to play in clubs. A few get good enough to put out albums (or MP3s or whatever). A very few make money. Basically, the cost and inconvenience of developing acts falls on the wanna-be performers. By the time they get to the music labels, a lot of the winnowing and development has already happened.

Even in Japan, where J-Pop is big business, you have J-Rock and jazz and a fairly wide range of choices. And choices drive competition, when reduces the stranglehold that music companies otherwise might have.

Strangely, Korea used to have a great live music scene. It was a long time ago, but back in the 1960s and 1970s, most of the big performers had a live music background, whether playing on the US Army bases around the country or playing the live clubs of Myeong-dong or wherever. Even in the 1980s, as Korea’s music scene turned more poppy and synthesized (and saccharine), there was still a live foundation most of the acts had — Cho Yong-pil, Shin Hae-chul, Jo Sung-mo, and the like were all live performers first.

But in the early 1990s, the scene began to change, especially with the coming of Seo Taiji. Even though Seo Taiji wrote his songs (well, mostly) and performed them himself, he typically performed them prerecorded, with The Boyz dancing away furiously beside him. It was the formula that Korea’s music companies would use to create their boy- and girl-bands. And soon the manufactured dance bands came fast and furious. Within a few years, they dominated the TV music shows, Mnet, and the like.

For a generation of young people in Korea, being a “star” has meant being a dancer first, a pretty face and perhaps a singer. Very few young people pick up a guitar with dreams of making it big. Sure, plenty of kids play music, for any number of reasons. But few harbor serious dreams of using the guitar (or whatever) to become rock stars.

And as long as the live music scene is not a viable route to becoming a star in Korea, the local music scene will remain dominated by the music labels and manufactured pop music.

The funny thing is, for all the talk of the dominating power of the music companies, the truth is they are actually very weak. They are merely responding to the economics they are given. If young people were to choose different music, the whole system would fall apart. If playing in Hongdae became a route to fame and fortune, then the system would have to change. But as long as Korean young people show no interest in anything but K-Pop, all they will be given is K-Pop. And the system will not really change.

Source: Mark Russell@Kpop Wars

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Credits: Minsarang.wordpress.com