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My Fave @ Dream Concert 2009 October 14, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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Dunn Dunn Dunn Dunn…

In Dream Concert 2009, a lot of Idol Groups and Artists join together to put out a great show. This is arguably the most wanted show in Korea on 2009 after all.

Thanks to Codemonmon Season 4 that’s always be my friend in youtube, providing me with the best video quality from Dream Concert 2009 and randomrinnie to provide some of the videos.

Super Junior put out the best of them bringing out their remix of Sorry Sorry and It’s You.


2PM (minus Jaebeom) performing I Hate You and Again and Again

I’m glad to see them together and put a strong performance even though I’m a little bit sad looking at the empty space in the middle (which belong to Jay)

The hot dancing machines Girls’ Generation

KARA with it’s butt dancing ~ Wanna and Mister


The Newest Edition F(X) with La Cha Ta

4Minute with its Muzik

another obsession Super Junior M bringing out Super Girl

the secret addition 2AM on a friend’s confession

The 반짝 반짝 샤방 샤방 (sparkling / flashing / glowing) SHINee doing Juliette

But.. the most favorite performance from Dream Concert 2009 for me is… dunn.. dunn.. dun.. dunn…

Clap together for SM TOWN !!

I am in awe with the performance seeing everybody together singing harmoniously making my heart melt. A lot of things happened in 2009 for a lot of Idol groups and artist in Korea. It’s good to see the power of friendship in at least 1 entertainment company. SM Town you rock the dream concert !!

Eunhyuk CY entry September 11, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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2009.09.11 금 04:08

미아………..
국제미아……………….
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아직안됐음 ^ㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡ^

Source: Eunhyuk’s Cyworld

Translation:

child gets lost………..
international child gets lost………………..
not yet^ㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡㅡ^

Source: denny_liz@sj-world.net , SapphirePearls

ke ke ke .. Eunhyuk.. you’re so funny

Super Junior UFOs September 1, 2009

Posted by tokkilin in Happening !.
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After all the moving, packing and throwing stuff for the past 2 weeks, I really need a refreshing time for myself. Filled up my resting days with loads of humor and entertainment. 2PM’s Wild Bunny never failed to entertain me, I think they’re really2 hilarious and crooked ^^. Another thing that entertain me is Super Junior UFO’s.  They cracks me up with their reply..

Credit to: omonatheydidn’t @ community journal

ELF: What type of girls does Siwon Gege like?
Siwon: Kind-hearted.
Kibum: Christians can’t tell lies, right?
Siwon: …… Beautiful, hot body.

ELF: Gege, reply me, let me feel blessed too.
Eunhyuk: Reply.
Ryeowook: Reply reply.
Sungmin: Reply reply reply.
Yesung: Reply reply reply reply.

ELF: Congratulations to Kangin for being the most popular in UFO, there is a special prize of $1000, for instructions to collect the prize, please reply.
Kangin: Reply!
Hankyung: You are a Chinese ELF, the one who used the same method to trick me into replying the other time?

ELF: Han Geng Han Xiao Meh, yes, i’m calling you, don’t pretend to not hear, make a sound. [meh is the sound a goat makes]
Hankyung: Meh~~~
Kangin: Chinese ELF? Caught!
Yesung: Have you eaten?
Donghae: Give me iced water, thanks, i’m hungry.

ELF: SJ-T fighting! SJ the top!
Donghae: Who is SJ-T, ELF, please support SJ-M!
Yesung: All of the adorable ELF, please support SJ-H!
Ryeowook: Don’t forget about KRY!
Leeteuk: All of you tired of living? Go back to sleep!
Shindong: Heechul hyung and Hankyung hyung are in the bathroom giving Champagne and Heebum a bubble bath, tears, I haven’t bathed.

ELF: I love you! Kim Jaejoong!!!
Hankyung: How do you know that i’m currently on the phone with Jaejoong?! Amazing! Jaejoong, it’s yours……
Donghae: Wo Ai Ni! Xiang La Xiao Long Xia! [literally translated as ‘fragrant spicy little lobster’]
Heechul: Lee Donghae, don’t embarrass yourself together with your Hankyung hyung……
Hankyung: Heechul…… you’re biased!
Leeteuk: Low key low key! [as in, to keep a low profile]

ELF: Heechul Gege and Hankyung Gege, get married!
Yesung: I do!
Heechul: With who? Hankyung? Don’t know him very well.
Hankyung: Irresponsible fella, don’t have to take responsibility after eating? [eating here is a pun, R-21 references]
Siwon: Hyung, please help me stop my nose from bleeding.
Hankyung: What were you thinking, I was talking about eating my Beijing Fried Rice!
Leeteuk: Kids…… Keep it low key [as in, to keep a low profile]

ELF: One who only reads the messages and not reply are fools. [endearing term]
Donghae: Referring to you, the one below.
Kyuhyun: Referring to you, the one below.
Ryeowook: Referring to you, the one below.
Kibum: ……
Eunhyuk: Now, can’t dive either? [to dive means to hide]
Hankyung: You cannot see me, you cannot see me……
Siwon: To prove that I’m not a fool……
Leeteuk: All of you are really free nowadays, is it?

ELF: Is Heechul Gege playing games again? [refering to computer games]
Kangin: Zai nan zai nan! [zai nan is a term to refer to guys who do not go out, but stay home to play games]
Donghae: You are the zai nan, you and Leeteuk and your whole house are all zai nan.
Heechul: Donghae! Good job!

ELF: Hankyung Gege, your body is really good, let us take a look while you are bathing.
Heechul: Hankyung, remember to collect money.
Leeteuk: Good idea, I’ll pay here.
Hankyung:To go out to collect money while bathing, isn’t that crazy.

ELF: Geges(s) have to be together forever.
Leeteuk: Together with every ELF forever, love all of you.
Kyuhyun: Hyung, that was really greasy.
Shindong: Nods.
Yesung: Digs nose……

ELF: Gege(s) usually read fanfictions about who?
Shindong: about KangTeuk child-bearing, Eunhyuk’s recommendation.
Leeteuk: ……
Donghae: Xi Jing, Hankyung hyung’s recommendation. [Xi Jing = Hee Jing? Hee for Heechul, Jing for Beijing? Please verify! Haha.]
Hankyung: ……

Pop Goes Korea August 10, 2009

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Interesting article that I read at Minsarang. I think the writer of this article summed it really well.

—————————————————–

There is a fairly decent overview of the contract situation faced by entertainers in Korea over in today’s Joongang Ilbo. Using the lawsuit Dong Bang Shin Gi (aka TVXQ) has filed against SM Entertainment as the peg, the article looks at the long and onerous contracts that most entertainers in Korea have to have, especially singers.
As you have probably heard, on July 31, three members of DBSG filed suit against its management company, claiming their contract is unfair. DBSG is one of SME’s most popular bands these days, and is doing especially well in Japan, where they recently played two nights in the Tokyo Dome. The band’s complaints were mostly the same things we have heard over and over again in Korea over the years — their contracts are too long, their contracts do not pay enough, the penalties for leaving the management company are too severe, the performers do not have enough control over their own careers, the performers are not paid enough (probably the biggest issue).
I do not want to get into the details of DBSG’s particular case. That is something for the Korean courts to decide. But I do think that cases like these bring up a much bigger point.
Arguing about the “fairness” of idol contracts — how many years should they be, how much should the performers be paid, etc. — misses the big point. I am tempted to call it “Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic,” but that is probably a bit harsh — after all, the Korean entertainment industry is showing few signs of sinking any time soon. It is more like arguing about what kind of pain reliever is best for a critically ill patient. That is, such talk deals mostly with the symptoms of the disease and misses out entirely on the causes.
Korea’s pop idols are not paid poorly and overcontrolled because the management companies are evil. The management companies are just doing their best within the current system. And judging by the long list of big stars who have emerged from Korea’s music system over the years, they are apparently doing something right.
The trouble is, Korea’s music system itself, which is very resource-intensive and very top-down (like far too much of the Korean economy in general). Because the burden of developing stars and marketing them falls solely on the music companies, it takes a huge amount of money to create new stars. The biggest companies have over 50 performers (mostly young people) in training at a time, taking dance classes, singing classes, learning how to act like stars, and usually living in company housing, eating food paid for by the company, being driven everywhere by the company. All this adds up pretty quickly.
So when a band gets paid pennies for an album sale, you have to remember that the performers spent years in training before they earned any money, and that for each performing earning money and doing well, there are many other aspiring young people who never make it, but who nonetheless burn through company money. How many hopefuls does each company have for each performer who makes it? Five? Ten? I do not know, but it is big enough.
The real problem (as I argue in my book, POP GOES KOREA) is the lack of diversity in Korea’s music business, in particular the lack of a live music scene. In most countries, live music is the core, the heart. Young people pick up instruments and play in their parents’ garages or wherever. Some get good enough to play in clubs. A few get good enough to put out albums (or MP3s or whatever). A very few make money. Basically, the cost and inconvenience of developing acts falls on the wanna-be performers. By the time they get to the music labels, a lot of the winnowing and development has already happened.
Even in Japan, where J-Pop is big business, you have J-Rock and jazz and a fairly wide range of choices. And choices drive competition, when reduces the stranglehold that music companies otherwise might have.
Strangely, Korea used to have a great live music scene. It was a long time ago, but back in the 1960s and 1970s, most of the big performers had a live music background, whether playing on the US Army bases around the country or playing the live clubs of Myeong-dong or wherever. Even in the 1980s, as Korea’s music scene turned more poppy and synthesized (and saccharine), there was still a live foundation most of the acts had — Cho Yong-pil, Shin Hae-chul, Jo Sung-mo, and the like were all live performers first.
But in the early 1990s, the scene began to change, especially with the coming of Seo Taiji. Even though Seo Taiji wrote his songs (well, mostly) and performed them himself, he typically performed them prerecorded, with The Boyz dancing away furiously beside him. It was the formula that Korea’s music companies would use to create their boy- and girl-bands. And soon the manufactured dance bands came fast and furious. Within a few years, they dominated the TV music shows, Mnet, and the like.
For a generation of young people in Korea, being a “star” has meant being a dancer first, a pretty face and perhaps a singer. Very few young people pick up a guitar with dreams of making it big. Sure, plenty of kids play music, for any number of reasons. But few harbor serious dreams of using the guitar (or whatever) to become rock stars.
And as long as the live music scene is not a viable route to becoming a star in Korea, the local music scene will remain dominated by the music labels and manufactured pop music.
The funny thing is, for all the talk of the dominating power of the music companies, the truth is they are actually very weak. They are merely responding to the economics they are given. If young people were to choose different music, the whole system would fall apart. If playing in Hongdae became a route to fame and fortune, then the system would have to change. But as long as Korean young people show no interest in anything but K-Pop, all they will be given is K-Pop. And the system will not really change.
Source: Mark Russell@Kpop Wars

There is a fairly decent overview of the contract situation faced by entertainers in Korea over in today’s Joongang Ilbo. Using the lawsuit Dong Bang Shin Gi (aka TVXQ) has filed against SM Entertainment as the peg, the article looks at the long and onerous contracts that most entertainers in Korea have to have, especially singers.

As you have probably heard, on July 31, three members of DBSG filed suit against its management company, claiming their contract is unfair. DBSG is one of SME’s most popular bands these days, and is doing especially well in Japan, where they recently played two nights in the Tokyo Dome. The band’s complaints were mostly the same things we have heard over and over again in Korea over the years — their contracts are too long, their contracts do not pay enough, the penalties for leaving the management company are too severe, the performers do not have enough control over their own careers, the performers are not paid enough (probably the biggest issue).

I do not want to get into the details of DBSG’s particular case. That is something for the Korean courts to decide. But I do think that cases like these bring up a much bigger point.

Arguing about the “fairness” of idol contracts — how many years should they be, how much should the performers be paid, etc. — misses the big point. I am tempted to call it “Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic,” but that is probably a bit harsh — after all, the Korean entertainment industry is showing few signs of sinking any time soon. It is more like arguing about what kind of pain reliever is best for a critically ill patient. That is, such talk deals mostly with the symptoms of the disease and misses out entirely on the causes.

Korea’s pop idols are not paid poorly and overcontrolled because the management companies are evil. The management companies are just doing their best within the current system. And judging by the long list of big stars who have emerged from Korea’s music system over the years, they are apparently doing something right.

The trouble is, Korea’s music system itself, which is very resource-intensive and very top-down (like far too much of the Korean economy in general). Because the burden of developing stars and marketing them falls solely on the music companies, it takes a huge amount of money to create new stars. The biggest companies have over 50 performers (mostly young people) in training at a time, taking dance classes, singing classes, learning how to act like stars, and usually living in company housing, eating food paid for by the company, being driven everywhere by the company. All this adds up pretty quickly.

So when a band gets paid pennies for an album sale, you have to remember that the performers spent years in training before they earned any money, and that for each performing earning money and doing well, there are many other aspiring young people who never make it, but who nonetheless burn through company money. How many hopefuls does each company have for each performer who makes it? Five? Ten? I do not know, but it is big enough.

The real problem (as I argue in my book, POP GOES KOREA) is the lack of diversity in Korea’s music business, in particular the lack of a live music scene. In most countries, live music is the core, the heart. Young people pick up instruments and play in their parents’ garages or wherever. Some get good enough to play in clubs. A few get good enough to put out albums (or MP3s or whatever). A very few make money. Basically, the cost and inconvenience of developing acts falls on the wanna-be performers. By the time they get to the music labels, a lot of the winnowing and development has already happened.

Even in Japan, where J-Pop is big business, you have J-Rock and jazz and a fairly wide range of choices. And choices drive competition, when reduces the stranglehold that music companies otherwise might have.

Strangely, Korea used to have a great live music scene. It was a long time ago, but back in the 1960s and 1970s, most of the big performers had a live music background, whether playing on the US Army bases around the country or playing the live clubs of Myeong-dong or wherever. Even in the 1980s, as Korea’s music scene turned more poppy and synthesized (and saccharine), there was still a live foundation most of the acts had — Cho Yong-pil, Shin Hae-chul, Jo Sung-mo, and the like were all live performers first.

But in the early 1990s, the scene began to change, especially with the coming of Seo Taiji. Even though Seo Taiji wrote his songs (well, mostly) and performed them himself, he typically performed them prerecorded, with The Boyz dancing away furiously beside him. It was the formula that Korea’s music companies would use to create their boy- and girl-bands. And soon the manufactured dance bands came fast and furious. Within a few years, they dominated the TV music shows, Mnet, and the like.

For a generation of young people in Korea, being a “star” has meant being a dancer first, a pretty face and perhaps a singer. Very few young people pick up a guitar with dreams of making it big. Sure, plenty of kids play music, for any number of reasons. But few harbor serious dreams of using the guitar (or whatever) to become rock stars.

And as long as the live music scene is not a viable route to becoming a star in Korea, the local music scene will remain dominated by the music labels and manufactured pop music.

The funny thing is, for all the talk of the dominating power of the music companies, the truth is they are actually very weak. They are merely responding to the economics they are given. If young people were to choose different music, the whole system would fall apart. If playing in Hongdae became a route to fame and fortune, then the system would have to change. But as long as Korean young people show no interest in anything but K-Pop, all they will be given is K-Pop. And the system will not really change.

Source: Mark Russell@Kpop Wars

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Credits: Minsarang.wordpress.com

KPop in Time Magazine August 6, 2009

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Very very interesting. I came accross this article and find it a bit controversial.

Korean Pop – Flying Too High?

Indeed, with competition in the industry growing fierce, buying exposure for your stable of stars is becoming almost a necessity. The success rate for new acts is low. Perhaps one in 20 make it, but producers have investments to protect. By the time budding superstars are ready to go public, at least $50,000 may have been sunk into their grooming. To have any chance of a return, artists need exposure on radio shows and in the tabloids that cover the entertainment industry. Most important are appearances on the 20 or so entertainment shows run by the big three television networks—MBC, KBS and SBS—and on a few prime cable music-video shows. The exposure can cost more than $350,000, most of it for television. Producers consider it a bargain—the same amount spent would buy just 10 minutes of prime commercial advertising time, barely enough for three songs.

Getting plugged into the TV circuit is key to pushing your wannabe heartthrobs up the music charts. Run by TV stations, the charts provide a much-watched yardstick to gauge band popularity. But some say the charts are slanted in favor of the stars who make the most small-screen appearances—in Korea, rankings are only partly based on CD sales and fan voting. That makes TV appearances all the more important. “Bribing is marketing,” says an industry official. “With the least amount of money, you get the most effect.”

There is growing sentiment that the music business needs to clean up its act. Money has poured into the market, and too many production companies chase a finite pool of fresh talent. The top idols are still selling a million-plus CDs each time out, but average sales for second-tier artists have slipped by at least 20%. MP3 copying over the Internet is taking a big bite out of total sales, which slipped 9% last year.

Shady business customs could stifle development over the long term, says Lee Sang Ho, the television journalist who produced the MBC K-pop exposé. While other Korean industries have been bringing their business practices up to global standards, the pop music industry remains stuck in the past, Lee says. “The main problem is a lack of transparency. This has to be said for the betterment of the Korean mass music industry.” (Ironically, prosecutors have charged a former MBC producer with bribe taking.)

The probe, which has been ongoing for at least three months, seems likely to widen. Kim, the lead agent on the case, says investigators are now looking at the possibility that SM Entertainment violated laws governing the stock market. They suspect that SM Entertainment used its stock exchange listing to curry favor with TV executives, in some cases giving them free shares prior to SM Entertainment’s IPO in April 2000. On the books, the handouts were recorded as sales but the money was never collected, Kim alleges. The company released a statement saying it followed “normal procedures” in its IPO and pointedly denied an allegation that it distributed shares to the wife of a TV executive.

Lee, SM Entertainment’s boss, is in the U.S. until August on business, according to the company. Meanwhile, Kim says at least 10 more television producers and journalists covering the entertainment industry will be brought in for questioning this week. Some suspects are already in hiding or overseas, says Kim. But “we will not stop our investigation until we get to the truth and punish those responsible,” he says. “We are concerned [the investigation] could paralyze the show business industry, so we are going all out to expedite it.”

The stars themselves are just hoping this will all blow over soon. With their managers spending half the time answering questions from prosecutors, or hoping not to be the next one called in, it’s hard to keep a tune going. J.T.L.’s Jang says he’s not sure if the upheaval will really clean things up. “Once your expectations are too high then you can just get more disappointed,” he says. Fellow band member Lee Jae Won declines to discuss the investigation, saying it wouldn’t be wise for a pop star to bad-mouth the industry. “That’s like asking us to dig our own graves,” he says.

For high-profile boy bands like god, the scandal could taint what should be a heavenly ride to the top. If fans begin to doubt the legitimacy of their idols, the pact the industry’s producers seem to have made with capitalism’s darker forces could take the wind out of Asia’s most dynamic music scene. Even an act of god might not save K-pop.

—With reporting by Kim Yeoshin and Kim Yoo Seung/Seoul

With all of the things happening between TVXQ and SM Entertainment, KPop industry got the impact around the world. Good thing because KPop became well known, Bad thing because it’s well known for the bad stuff.